Projects > Writing

Rendering is a depiction of a well-known setting. My acquaintance with such a view occurred at random during a visit to the historic site of Falling Water. In its park-like setting, I strolled through patches of dappled sunlight, meandered under green canopies and meditated upon the sound of running water. Who drew liquid like hair, rendered swirls of currents and composed of apocalyptic landscapes of water engulfing towns? In response to the inquisitive deluge, I uttered, “Leonardo da Vinci” while simultaneously becoming conscious of standing on a Pennsylvania embankment and staring at a house that spewed forth a stream from its foundation.

Rendering then is a product of interpretation whose creation was inspired by the collision of vision and thought. The image is a composite of forms developed from ideology. During each of their respective lifetimes, Wright and da Vinci were involved in creating visual systems that would enhance humanity’s ability to exist objectively and subjectively within a turbulent terrain. Both determined that order could be created out of chaos and both engaged in developing a humanist methodology, which influenced the perception of the environment. They believed nature to be culture’s point of origin and so, an analysis of it inspired the construction of systematic theories based upon simple geometric forms. The goal was not to depict what nature presented to man, but to create a cultivated point of view.

These attempts in past history to define vision through representation strongly influence our present. To this day, we continue to be dependent upon seeking out a vanishing point. Our minds habitually determine the existence of multiple converging lines even though such a linear schema is invisible to the naked eye. Infinity and a well-placed horizon line maintain the fluidity of time and space. Yet, this is an invented system, emphasized during the Renaissance era and indoctrinated by pedagogical influence. Its historical advocacy is depicted in da Vinci’s proliferation of sketches, in Wright’s utilization of the drafting process and, in present day activities where individuals are found peering into the Cartesian picture plane of their computer monitors. Each new era is heralded by an alteration of perceiving perspective while the preceding theories form themselves into an ever-thickening stratum.

In the end, Rendering is an artwork created not from what I have seen, but from an awareness of how vision and experience are conditioned. It exists to be re-created by others and is therefore, a devised process for re-evaluating the familiar. In replicating my methodology, you will no doubt begin by carefully following the instructions and then eventually, succumb to your own subjective decision-making process. The impulse to deviate will become pronounced while plotting the cascading house or composing the running stream. The step-by-step procedure should be interpreted as a guide. By involving yourself in constructing Rendering, a personal inquiry with history and individuality is begun. Such an engagement will culminate in the presentation of a re-rendering.

Rendering: Jeannette Louie


Introduction to "Rendering" Manual
2000

Introduction to "Rendering" Manual

"Rendering" is an installation. The manual is an instructional element of the installation that specifies the construction of the large installation. The installation is editioned (25).
2000